Departments

Four Arabic credits are required for graduation from ATIS.

ARABIC 9
Course # 404

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course emphasizes the essential skills in writing, recitation, grammar, and composition. Students will further develop the ability to listen, understand, and use vocabulary through a variety of subjects. Grammar, including kinds of verbs, use of pronouns, use of dictionaries, parts of communication, kinds of sentences, and language functions in persuasive writing is taught to improve speaking and writing. Students will also practice written composition and literary criticism.

ARABIC 10
Course # 405

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course emphasizes the major branches of reading, grammar, and writing. Students will develop comprehension, listening, and vocabulary skills through reading (both oral and silent) and writing. Emphasis will be placed on comprehension and recitation of poetry from many sources such as the Koran and the sayings of the Prophet, verses of poetry from the Pre-Islamic age and the Islamic reign. The study of grammar will be incorporated into the correction of students’ writings and oral readings. Grammar topics will include nouns, infinitives, and the use of verbs.

ARABIC 11
Course # 406

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Students will continue to study the three major areas of reading, writing and grammar. Knowledge of the Arabic language will be enriched and extended by studying subjects that promote the use of Arabic in reading and writing. In order to develop skills in critical and analytical thinking, assignments will include material about scientific research.

ARABIC 12
Course # 407

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course emphasizes reading, poetry, literature, and writing. Students will work to develop their comprehension, listening, and vocabulary skills. Writing skills will be practiced through the assignment of compositions. In grammar, students will study verbs, pronouns, and language functions.

Four Arabic as a Foreign Language credits are required for graduation from ATIS for those students enrolled in AFL program.

AFL 9
Course # 413

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Arabic as a Foreign Language is taught to those students who are not proficient enough in Arabic to take the full Arabic language course. The curriculum is one set forth by the Ministry of Education. Vocabulary, polite and situational conversation, beginning and advanced writing are the major components of the course. The aim of this course is to prepare students to move into regular Arabic as soon as possible.

AFL 10
Course # 414

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Arabic as a Foreign Language is taught to those students who are not proficient enough in Arabic to take the full Arabic language course. The curriculum is one set forth by the Ministry of Education. Vocabulary, polite and situational conversation, beginning and advanced writing are the major components of the course. The aim of this course is to prepare students to move into regular Arabic as soon as possible.

AFL 11
Course # 415

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Arabic as a Foreign Language is taught to those students who are not proficient enough in Arabic to take the full Arabic language course. The curriculum is one set forth by the Ministry of Education. Vocabulary, polite and situational conversation, beginning and advanced writing are the major components of the course. The aim of this course is to prepare students to move into regular Arabic as soon as possible.

AFL 12
Course # 416

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Arabic as a Foreign Language is taught to those students who are not proficient enough in Arabic to take the full Arabic language course. The curriculum is one set forth by the Ministry of Education. Vocabulary, polite and situational conversation, beginning and advanced writing are the major components of the course.

The English program is a cornerstone of the intellectual, social, and personal growth of ATIS students. English courses not only provide a comprehensive range of the historical, cultural and aesthetic scope of literature from around the world, they enable students to develop their skills of communication in the English language through reading, writing, speaking, listening and researching. Through the reading and study of literature, media, non-fiction and other forms of the written and spoken word, students are challenged to think critically, develop intellectual independence, and effectively convey their ideas to others. Instruction in grammar and vocabulary provides essential knowledge and requires the development of sound study habits in our students.

We believe the insights and experiences gained in the English Department will enable our students to become responsible global citizens. We foster this by encouraging our students to "read the world" because exploring the human experience allows students to deepen their self-understanding, and by exploring different perspectives they create opportunities to better understand the human condition, develop tolerance, learn social justice, and formulate new ways to think about their lives. We further believe the materials chosen from both American and British literature will challenge students to question, reflect upon their own ideas, and then to reconfirm, strengthen and broaden or revise their views as citizens of a multicultural community in which all people with their differences can also be right.

In addition, the English Department’s goal is to ensure that formative and summative assessments align with the practices of the common core standards and evaluate students’ assessments according to the common core criteria throughout the high school English program. Through a consistent and coherent approach throughout the English program, students will be challenged to meet high measurable standards which are clearly defined and implemented. This integrated approach will help prepare our students to be responsible, productive and ethical world citizens with the skills and passion to think creatively, reason critically, and communicate effectively.

The English Department also offers AP Literature and Composition as a college level course to Grade 12 students. This course allows academically talented students to participate in a college level course and possibly earn college credit while still in high school. AP courses are challenging, rigorous, and in-depth. Students are given the responsibility to reason, analyze, and understand for themselves. Students who succeed in AP courses generally do well in college as a result of a demanding academic preparation.

Our ultimate goal is for students to strive for continuous and meaningful improvement of both their reading and writing skills.

Deidre Cornberg
Head of English Department

The knowledge of English forms the foundation for each student’s continuing academic growth. The four components of language arts (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are necessary to develop clear communications skills and the ability to think critically and constructively. A minimum of four credits are required for graduation from ATIS.

Four English credits are required for graduation from ATIS.

Flow Chart of English Courses:

Required courses are:
           9th Grade          English 9
           10th Grade        English 10
           11th Grade        English 11
           12th Grade        English 12 or AP English Literature

English

NOTE: English Literature I, English Literature II, Drama and Journalism are elective English courses but do NOT count toward the required four credits of English.

ENGLISH 9 Literature and Composition
Course # 004

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course is designed to help students understand literature and react to it through a wide variety of purposes, styles, and forms of writing. Literary genres covered will be short stories, poetry, non-fiction, and drama. Students will focus on expository and narrative writing, be exposed to research materials and procedures, and the study of short stories, poetry, and non-fiction. One novel (minimum) will also be included as a unit of study. The grammar section of this course will cover usage and mechanism; composition skills from the basic paragraph to more complex essay writing, vocabulary development, research and study skills.

ENGLISH 10 Literature and Composition
Course # 005

Pre-requisite: English 9

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course will help students develop descriptive, narrative, and expository writing skills while studying various short stories, non-fiction, autobiographies, biographies, and novels. Students will also advance their speaking and listening skills through small and large group and individual speaking and listening discussions. Students will continue to develop writing skills while studying poetry, novels, and Shakespearean drama. Students will advance their research and analytical kills by completing a research paper.

ENGLISH 11 American Literature and Composition
Course # 006

Pre-requisite: English 10

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This course builds on knowledge gained in both ninth and tenth grade. All of the language arts – writing, speaking, critical thinking, listening, viewing, and presenting – will be incorporated into the course with special emphasis on critical thinking, writing, and vocabulary development; and preparation for taking the SAT test. Grammatical and organizational techniques are reviewed and enhanced with a variety of writing assignments from the simple essay to the extensive research paper. The students are asked to read and write critically. British Literature is discussed, employing both a thematic and chronological approach.

ENGLISH 12 English Literature and Composition
Course # 007

Pre-requisite: English 11

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

The course is an in-depth study of significant themes in World Literature. Reading and writing required in the course are extensive. The course is designed to improve the student’s power of critical analysis as well as to develop her mastery of prose style and form. The literature studied is from around the world, and time periods range from the classical to the present. Students will be expected to write a research paper.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE and COMPOSITION
Course # 008

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Advanced English 11, GPA 3.40, teacher recommendation, entrance test required, and teacher interview

Note: only offered to 12th graders, this is a college level course. Students may need to meet for additional classes in the spring to prepare for the AP exam.

The cost of AP English Literature and Composition Exam is 50 KD

Advanced Placement (AP) English is a full-year twelfth grade course for students who have consistently demonstrated superior ability in English and qualified through his/her performance in English 11. Student planning to take AP English must attend a meeting with the instructor to receive a required summer reading and writing assignments. Advanced Placement (AP) English is a year-long course designed and seeks to develop a student’s mastery of prose style and form. Students will examine a selection of contemporary and classical works of fiction and non-fiction to expose students to major themes, literary movements, expression of diverse cultural voices and a critical understanding of literature as an art form. Students will perform in-depth studies of literature from genres such as the novel, short story, poetry, and drama. Responses to literature will be through extensive writing in a variety of forms, class discussions, and impromptu writing. Students should expect to complete between 75 – 100 pages of reading a week. Students will also practice taking portions of the AP test. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Some colleges and universities grant credit for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on this examination.

ENGLISH LITERATURE I
Course # 011

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

NOTE: English Literature 1 is an elective English course but does NO count toward the required four years of English.

This course is a survey of major British authors. Works studied include Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the legends of King Arthur, Wordsworth, Keats, and Bronte, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, and Eliot. This course emphasizes oral and written analysis of literature. Several short papers are undertaken that require some research. Skills emphasized include reading critically and independently, understanding plot structure, using and understanding figurative language, identifying themes in literature, proofreading, and oral reporting.

JOURNALISM / MEDIA STUDIES 1
Course # 019

Grades 11 - 12

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course provides an overview of the mass communications field with an emphasis on journalism and news media. The course examines the various forms of mass media, advertising/public relations, journalism ethics, the mass media’s influence on society and some legal aspects. Students will have a short introduction to broadcasting, photo-journalism and oral communication process.
In addition, students will work together to produce the student newspaper. Focus will be on writing news, feature, and sports stories as well as writing editorials and columns. During the class period, students will layout and design the newspaper and produce appropriate graphics and photographs.
Students will take up full responsibility for its development, production, and marketing while meeting similar challenges to those experienced by the professional field.

JOURNALISM / MEDIA STUDIES 2
Course # 021

Grades 11 – 12

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

NOTE: Journalism/Media Studies is an elective English course but does NO count toward the required four years of English.

This course provides an overview of the mass communications field with an emphasis on journalism and news media. The course examines the various forms of mass media, advertising/public relations, journalism ethics, the mass media’s influence on society and some legal aspects. Students will have a short introduction to broadcasting, photo-journalism and oral communication process.
In addition, students will work together to produce the student newspaper. Focus will be on writing news, feature, and sports stories as well as writing editorials and columns. During the class period, students will layout and design the newspaper and produce appropriate graphics and photographs.
Students will take up full responsibility for its development, production, and marketing while meeting similar challenges to those experienced by the professional field.

The goals of the Fine Arts department at ATIS are to inspire in the students a love of the Arts and to help students gain an understanding of the Arts throughout human history.

At all levels, student artwork is considered for displays and contests. As students gain experience in basic processes, they may then choose to use more complex materials and tools. In addition to creating artwork, students will study other artists and their artworks. Students may be asked to bring a minimum of personal supplies.

One Fine Arts credit is required for graduation from ATIS.

ART I
Course #503

Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course will allow for experimentation in a variety of media as well as initiating an appreciation of visual arts. The following concepts will be introduced: design, color, form, line, space, and texture. Students are encouraged to explore personal expression through both two-dimension and three-dimensional art forms. Elements of art history will be introduced as they relate to work in class.

ART 2
Course # 504

Pre-requisite: ART I

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course is an intermediary art course. Further refinement of drawing and painting skills will be the primary focus, but various art making practices and new media may be introduced such as pastel painting, colored pencil, mixed media, scratchboard, and mask painting. Visual literacy and visual communication skills will be further developed. Historical and contemporary topics will be evident in student work and / or through class discussion.

ART 3
Course # 505

Pre-requisite: ART 2

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course includes skills learned in ART 2 applied to a more advanced level course. The fundamentals of design are explored in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional artworks. The student is introduced to the concept of defining and developing a basic system of problem solving. An opportunity is provided for exploration in the areas of value drawing, scratchboard, printmaking, collage and pastels.

As a new academic year approaches, I would like to welcome you and your child to the ICT program. Our program is composed of regular ICT classes from KG to grade 10, and elective courses for grades 11 and 12.

ICT is a hands-on, challenging subject. Students will learn a variety of skills such as, Word Processing, Databases, Worksheets and Calculations, Programming, Computer Engineering, and Computer Design.

Ms. Hanan Anabusi
ICT Department Coordinator

The technology program offers one-semester electives, which meet graduation requirements. These courses are designed to improve student skills in using software applications and to teach students how to use software to complete class and school projects.

One Information Technology credit required for graduation from ATIS.

INTERNET POLICY –
Access to the computer network, including the Internet is designed for educational purposes. All users of school computer equipment MUST agree to abide by the following rules at ATIS.

Please be aware that we at ATIS will do the best we can to monitor students’ use of the Internet. Currently, the school has put a block in place so that inappropriate material is not accessible. The Internet system at ATIS is to be used only for appropriate educational activities related to a student’s classroom assignments and/or library activities.

Please be aware that we at ATIS will do the best we can to monitor students’ use of the Internet. Currently, the school has put a block in place so that inappropriate material is not accessible. The Internet system at ATIS is to be used only for appropriate educational activities related to a student’s classroom assignments and/or library activities.

  • Students, Parents, and Teachers must sign an Internet Policy Agreement and Form.
  • Students will use the Internet exclusively for educational purposes (this may include personal needs searches if approved by the supervising teacher).
  • Students must follow appropriate Internet use instructions.
  • Chat rooms are not allowed.
  • No commercial CD’s allowed and disks from home or other need to be cleared by the teacher before use. (This will ensure the safety of our school-wide network from viruses and other problematic programs.)
  • Teachers are expected to instruct their students regarding use of the Internet and to monitor student use at all times.

The use of the Internet is restricted to students:

  • Whose teachers have given an assignment requiring the use of the Internet
  • Who have a valid Internet use agreement signed by parent, teacher and student on file in the school’s database.

ICT 1
Course # 603

Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Students will be introduced to basic computer concepts and have hands-on training in Microsoft Office application suite software, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. Students will learn commands needed to create, edit, enhance, save, print, and use effectively word processing documents, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation slide shows.

ICT 2
Course # 604

Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course applies advanced concepts and principles using word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and electronic presentation software. Students will integrate applications learned. This course builds on skills included in ICT 1.

IT PROGRAMMING
Course # 610

Grades 12
Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course teaches the languages used to make Applications. The most common languages are Visual Basic and Visual Basic C. students will be able to make a program that will enable them to perform certain/specific tasks. Students will learn the Algorithms to learn other languages.

IT DESIGN
Course # 611

Grades 11
Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course is designed to expand your experience with different computer-based applications. Students will learn to work with graphics/pictures by using Adobe Photoshop, units in Power Point (presentations), and iMovie. Students will be able to develop their own multimedia projects, as well as, DVD personal movies. Students will learn to use other technology as well, including printers, the Internet, digital cameras, and scanners.

IT ENGINEERING
Course # 612

Grades 11
Pre-requisite: None

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Note: Students are expected to buy an Electronics kit box

This course integrates several fields of electrical engineering and computer science required to develop computer systems. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an in-depth, “hands-on” experience about Machine/Binary Code and IC Gates. The content of this course includes but is not limited to the following areas of study: electronics and how they work, hardware and their components.

Three Islamic Studies credits are required for graduation from ATIS.

ISLAMIC STUDIES 9 and KORAN 9
Course # 423 / Course # 433

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

The content of this course covers the broad spectrum of personal conduct and social responsibilities in the student’s life. This course seeks to teach students the highest standards of morality by setting Allah’s will as their life-long objective. The source of all moral values is the Holy Koran and the sayings of the Prophet. The concepts emphasized are: the existence and worship of Allah, the effects of faith on and in the lives of individuals, man as the representative of Allah on Earth, the pursuit of knowledge, lawful and unlawful things in Islam, acts of devotion, and personal care (physical and mental).

ISLAMIC STUDIES 10 and KORAN 10
Course # 424 / Course # 434

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

The content of this course centers around the pillar of the Islamic faith and personal morality based on the spirit of Islam. Students will gain a better understanding of the creation of the universe and conclude that Allah is Lord of the world. The following concepts will be covered: the legal system of Islam and how it leads to the general welfare of the individual and society, the fundamental rights of humanity which are laid down by Islam and must be respected, and the simple and straightforward path of Islam.

ISLAMIC STUDIES 11 and KORAN 11
Course # 425 / Course # 435

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

The content of this course teaches the fundamental morals which cover students’ lives both at home and in society. Through the study of the Holy Koran and the sayings of the Prophet, students will learn moral responsibility and self-control. Students will be helped to develop a deeper love of their religion and pride in their religious heritage. The concepts covered in this course include: liberty, brotherhood, democracy, equality, cultural heritage, laws of marriage and inheritance, and proof of Allah’s existence.

ISLAMIC STUDIES 12 and KORAN 12
Course # 426 / Course # 436

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

The content of this course centers on the mind and spirit of the student. The Holy Koran, the traditions and sayings of the Prophet, and the lives and history of Islamic individuals are used as the framework within which students learn about moral behavior and responsibility. This course also looks at how students can balance mind and spirit and life today and in the hereafter.

Three Special Islamic Studies and Special Koran credits are required for graduation from ATIS for those students enrolled in this program.

SPECIAL ISLAMIC STUDIES 9 and SPECIAL KORAN 9
Course # 443 / Course # 453

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

Special Koran is taught to those students who are not fluent enough in Arabic to take religion education in Arabic. The Ministry of Education sets the curriculum. This course is the study of Islam: its beliefs, the Koran, and Islam as a way of life.

SPECIAL ISLAMIC STUDIES 10 and SPECIAL KORAN 10
Course # 444 / Course # 454

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

Special Koran is taught to those students who are not fluent enough in Arabic to take religion education in Arabic. The Ministry of Education sets the curriculum. This course is the study of Islam: its beliefs, the Koran, and Islam as a way of life.

SPECIAL ISLAMIC STUDIES 11 and SPECIAL KORAN 11
Course # 445 / Course # 455

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

Special Koran is taught to those students who are not fluent enough in Arabic to take religion education in Arabic. The Ministry of Education sets the curriculum. This course is the study of Islam: its beliefs, the Koran, and Islam as a way of life.

SPECIAL ISLAMIC STUDIES 12 and SPECIAL KORAN 12
Course # 446 / Course # 456

Length: Year Credit: 0.75

Special Koran is taught to those students who are not fluent enough in Arabic to take religion education in Arabic. The Ministry of Education sets the curriculum. This course is the study of Islam: its beliefs, the Koran, and Islam as a way of life.

One Living Values credit is required for graduation from ATIS.

LIVING VALUES 9
Course # 463

Length: Year Credit: 0.25

Living Values support the overall development of the individual and a culture of positive values in each society and throughout the world, believing that education is a purposeful activity designed to help humanity flourish.

LIVING VALUES 10
Course # 464

Length: Year Credit: 0.25

Living Values support the overall development of the individual and a culture of positive values in each society and throughout the world, believing that education is a purposeful activity designed to help humanity flourish.

LIVING VALUES 11
Course # 465

Length: Year Credit: 0.25

Living Values support the overall development of the individual and a culture of positive values in each society and throughout the world, believing that education is a purposeful activity designed to help humanity flourish.

LIVING VALUES 12
Course # 466

Length: Year Credit: 0.25

Living Values support the overall development of the individual and a culture of positive values in each society and throughout the world, believing that education is a purposeful activity designed to help humanity flourish.

The Math department strives to meet the needs of each student by providing courses that allow the student to develop a competency in mathematical skills, and in critical and analytical thinking.

Three Mathematics credits are required for graduation from ATIS. Four credits highly recommended for Science track students.

Courses taken in the eighth grade may not be used to satisfy ATIS graduation requirements or the core curriculum requirement. Students planning to go to college should complete a minimum of four credits in mathematics. If a highly motivated student wants to take two math classes concurrently, she should talk to the Math Head of Department and the counselor.

Flow Chart of Math Courses:

Algebra 1   to   Geometry
Geometry   to   Algebra 2
Algebra 2   to   Pre-Calculus or Business Statistics
Pre-Calculus   to   AP Calculus or Business Statistics

Math

ALGEBRA 1
Course # 104

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Pre-Algebra
Algebra 1 is imperative for success in subsequent math courses, and transitions students from arithmetic to symbolic reasoning. They key content involves understanding writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations and inequalities. When graphing linear equations, emphasis will be placed on understanding the slope-intercept formula and sloe in general as it relates to parallel and perpendicular lines. Solving systems of two linear equations in two unknowns is also emphasized. Quadratic equations will be solved by factoring, using graphs, and applying the quadratic formula. Students should also become comfortable with operations on monomial and polynomial expressions. They learn to solve problems employing all of these techniques. Algebra 1 meets the graduation requirement. This course is the pre-requisite to Geometry.

GEOMETRY
Course # 105

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Algebra 1
Note: With a teacher recommendation, this course may be taken concurrently with Algebra 2. Recommended: B or better in Algebra 1

The key content for Geometry includes a formal development of geometric skills and concepts. This course introduces plane and solid geometry. They will develop the ability to construct formal logical arguments and proofs in a geometric setting. Students will build their reasoning skills through studying the following topics: properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, compass constructions, transformations, volume, area, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, coordinate geometry, and an introduction to basic trigonometric functions. Emphasis will be placed on formal proofs and students are expected to have a firm grasp of Algebra 1 concepts. Geometry meets the graduation requirements and prepares a student for Algebra 2.

ALGEBRA 2
Course # 106

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Geometry
Note: With a teacher recommendation, course may be taken concurrently with Geometry. Recommended: B or better in Algebra 1

This course expands and reviews the mathematical content of Algebra 1 and Geometry. Emphasis is placed on abstract thinking skills, the function concept including domain and range, extension from the real to the complex number system, and the algebraic solution of problems in various content areas. Polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, and conic functions and relations comprise the core material through which equations and graphs are studied and applied. Additional topics include probability, basic statistics, sequences, and series. Calculators are used to aid in the solution of problems and in making estimates for realistic solutions.

PRE-CALCULUS
Course # 107

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Algebra 2
This course includes an in-depth algebraic and graphical analysis of different families of functions and their inverses, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric functions. Rectangular, polar, and parametric forms of an equation will be taught in addition to vectors and their graphs. Further study of topics introduced in earlier courses includes matrices and determinants, coordinate geometry, conic sections, series and sequences, binomial expansion, properties of radical expressions, complex numbers, de Moivre’s Theorem, limits (epsilon-delta), and introduction to Calculus. Pre-Calculus provides the foundation for college mathematics.

AP CALCULUS
Course # 109

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Pre-Calculus, teacher recommendation, GPA
Recommended: B or better in Pre-Calculus
This course follows the outline prescribed by the College Board and, as such, the AP Calculus test given in May for college placement is required.
Note: only offered to 12th graders, this is a college level course. Students may need to meet for additional classes in the spring to prepare for the AP exam.
The cost of AP Calculus Exam is 50 KD

This course focuses on the application of limits of functions, continuity, and derivatives are studied in detail. Both indefinite and definite integrals are explored, with applications to area and volume. The anti-derivative, sequences and series, and differential equations are also included along with analytic geometry. The student will the line, vectors in a plane, the circle, conics, relations, functions and their graphs, the intersections of loci, non-linear inequalities in the plane, parametric equations, polar coordinated, and solid analytic geometry.
Graphic calculators will be used extensively.

BUSINESS STATISTICS
Course # 110

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This is an introductory statistic course. The focus of this course is the use of statistics in practical applications with an emphasis on finite mathematics and algebraic skills. The course includes data collection and representation, understanding simple probabilities and sampling. Real data of interest to the students is used and simulations of real events are demonstrated to show how to use statistical ideas to gain useful information from numbers. Specific topics will include measures of central tendency, standard deviation, modeling and graphing.

Note: This course is not recommended to take the place of Pre-Calculus for the college-bound student.

A Message from PE Coordinator

As the beginning of a new school year approaches, we welcome you and your child to our PE and Athletic program!
You are an important part of your child's well-being experience.There is a vital link between learning at school and at home. We need to work together to help yourchild develop gross motor skills.

The Physical Education Department provides all children with a qualityinstructional program in a safe, secure, caring, and inclusive environment, so that they willdemonstrate the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional outcomes necessary to become successful in a changing, and diverse world.

The goals of Physical Education Department at ATIS are to offer students, through participation in competitive and non-competitive sports, an opportunity to experience meaningful growth, accomplishment, success and the realization of ones’ fullest potential. The opportunity for participation in a wide variety of global activities is a vital part of a student’s educational experience.

Personal physical fitness and wellness are important life skills that create a future activity and good health. Classes are structured to create positive attitudes towards personal fitness, activity, and nutrition. Classes are offered to meet a variety of skills levels, interests, and abilities.

Participation Requirements: all students will be expected to participate in classroom and field activities.

Dress Requirements: Students are expected to wear clothes and shoes appropriate to the activity. Shorts, t-shirts, and sneakers are required as well as a sweat suit or warm-up suit for outdoor activities in the late fall and/or early spring.

One Physical Education credit is required for graduation from ATIS.

P.E. 9
Course # 703

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Students in this course will be exposed to a variety of team and individual sports, which may include badminton, basketball, circuit training, floor hockey, soccer, softball, and volleyball. A portion of each class is set aside for exercise and stretching activities.

P.E. 10
Course # 704

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

P.E. 10 is a continuation of the fundamentals of various individuals and team activities stressed in P.E. 9. Emphasis is placed upon participation, dressing for class, knowledge and rules of physical activities, and any written skill testing or physical testing for assessment purposes.

P.E. 11
Course # 705

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Students will be able to participate in a variety of team sports. The student will gain fundamental skills, techniques, and strategies utilized in selected team sports. The student will also have a complete understanding of the history and rules of the selected sports. While participating in this course, the student will understand the importance of teamwork and value the fitness benefits gained from participating in a team sport.

P.E. 12
Course # 706

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

This course will continue participation in sports introduced in P.E. 9. The intensity of participation and development of skills will increase. More competitive activities through games and tournaments and strategies and fitness training will be emphasized. Students will focus on their skill-related fitness in the areas of agility, balance, coordination, speed, power and reaction time. The following sports will be covered: softball, team handball, basketball, volleyball, ultimate Frisbee, soccer, and floor hockey. A portion of each class period is set aside for exercise and stretching activities.

The school science curriculum includes a significant experiential learning component, providing our students with every opportunity to learn about the various strands of science not only from their text books and their teachers, but also from the own experience. Each year students present a science based project for “Science Week”, a project that records their experiential learning, and in every quarter of the school year students in every class use our science laboratories to experiment with science. There are science laboratories in the school, located on different floors, catering for all Middle and High School classes and providing some lab time for Elementary classes.

In the High School program Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, Biology and Environmental Science are taught as separate subjects, while the General Science program in Middle School includes elements of all of those over the three years. This combination meets the stated learning outcomes and objectives of the American Curriculum followed by the school.

The Environmental Science Club is an extra-curriculum activity where students discuss major environmental issues such as global warming, recycling, alternative clean energy sources, and organic gardening.

Mr. Jameel Mustafa
MS/HS Science Coordinator

Through a variety of courses, students will learn to apply scientific skills in problem solving as well as apply scientific principles to everyday life. Students will develop an inquiry approach to the study of science through laboratory experiences. It is strongly recommended that students preparing to attend university to take 4 years of Sciences. University bound students should also consider additional courses in Physics, Environmental Science and Chemistry 2.

Four Science credits are required for graduation from ATIS.

Flow Chart of Science Courses:

Science

EARTH SCIENCE
Course # 203

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: None
This course is designed to provide the student with a general overview of earth and space science, while addressing the origin, structure, and physical phenomena of the earth and universe. Studies include concepts of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, geology, and earth resources are covered in the section on earth structure. The weather unit covers the structure of the atmosphere and how different types of weather are generated. Astronomy will cover the formation of stars, galaxies, and the solar system. The Physics unit is designed to provide the student with a general overview of physical systems. Linear motion is studied with section on measuring motion and Newton’s three laws of linear motion. Machines are the major focus of the section on work and energy. The course concludes with study of the relationship between electricity and magnetism.

BIOLOGY 1
Course # 204

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Earth Science
This course is designed to provide the student with a general overview of biological systems. It reviews material on cell structure and function. It then covers topics in cell biology, genetics, heredity, and genetic engineering, classification of organisms, human biology and ecology. It also includes a survey of the five kingdoms of living things.

CHEMISTRY 1
Course # 205

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Algebra 1
This course is designed to provide the student with a general overview of chemical systems. It reviews characteristics of matter; energy transformation, physical and chemical properties and changes in matter; atomic structure and nuclear chemistry; the periodic table of elements; behavior of gases, chemical bonding and reactions; oxidation-reduction processes; solution chemistry; scientific techniques and measurement in science. It introduces the naming of chemicals, chemical quantities and conversions. It also introduces acids and bases, and salts; and touches slightly on organic chemistry. This laboratory-oriented course is also designed to help students use their knowledge to make informed decisions about chemical issues in their society and the world.

PHYSICS
Course # 206

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Algebra 2
This college preparatory course includes a variety of physics topics and their relation to everyday life including: motion, forces, energy, momentum, heat, thermodynamics, properties of waves, sound, light and electricity, principles and applications of mechanics, and properties of matter. Other topics studied are geometric optics, force field quantum mechanics, and the physics of atomic structure.

Note: It is recommended that Pre-Calculus or Calculus is taken concurrently. Students considering a career in architecture, engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics should strongly consider this course.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Course # 210

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Environmental Science investigates modern environmental issues integrating concepts from biology, earth science and chemistry. The course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students will participate in field studies to collect and analyze authentic data and to evaluate specific environments.

CHEMISTRY 2
Course # 211

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Minimum grade of B+ in Chemistry 1 and Algebra 2, teacher recommendation.
This course covers topics such as the structure (atomic theory, chemical bonding, and nuclear chemistry) and state of matter (gases, liquids, and solutions), reactions, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, formulae and descriptive chemistry, and lab work. This is a college preparatory course with laboratory covering the topics of chemical reactions, energy, acid and bases, molecular structure, solutions, gases, equilibrium and oxidation/ reduction.

BIOLOGY 2
Course # 212

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: Minimum grade of B+ in Biology 1 and Algebra 2, teacher recommendation.
This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Welcome to the Social Studies Department

At A’Takamul International School, Social Studies consist of:

Social Studies/Kuwait Studies (G6-7)
Geography (G8)
World History I/II (G9-10)
American History (G11)
Economics (G12)

We also offer our students in G11 and G12 the option of further study in Geography with our Geography I and Geography II courses.

These subjects are linked together because they are all about human beings. How they live, how they work together, how they think, how they behave, their culture, values, beliefs, ideas and past.

To do well in Social Studies, students need to be willing to think critically about the society in which they live in. To think afresh about ideas that most people take for granted and to ask questions that help them better understand the world around them. At ATIS we embed these skills from Grade 6 onwards building students who are able to question, think and analyse human society, past and present.

The Social Studies Department has an inclusive policy to learning with Creativity and Independent Learning at the heart of all we do. Students are in mixed ability groups where they can share ideas, experiences and questions as they explore their own and other people's lives. A strong emphasis is placed on our set of individual projects that students are required to complete each quarter for every grade level. These projects teach students skills that they can use to do well in these subject areas and life beyond school: researching and investigating a range of different topics, presenting their findings and ideas and managing their time, resources and workload.

If you have any questions about the Social Studies Department or any aspect of teaching and learning, please contact me at the following email address:
scott@atakamul.edu.kw

Mr Scott Hannan
Social Studies Coordinator

The Social Studies department provides students with the skills and knowledge needed to function as useful citizens by giving them an understanding of themselves and the world around them. All students are required to complete 4 credits in Social Studies. Most four-year universities require a minimum of three years of study in Social Studies classes.

Four credits in Social Studies are required for graduation from ATIS.

Flow Chart of Social Studies Courses:

SocialStudies

WORLD HISTORY 1: The Rise of Modern Western Civilizations
Course # 303

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: None
Students will deepen their understanding of various civilizations throughout the world and their interactions. Emphasis will shift toward understanding the rise and expansion of European civilization and its relationship to other regions. Students will learn to articulate a more sophisticated sense of cause and effect relationships, art history and analysis of historical sources.

WORLD HISTORY 2: 20th Century History
Course # 304

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

Pre-requisite: World History 1
The Grade 10 course combines the study of historical, geographic and cultural sources in order to provide students with a greater appreciation of 20th Century History. Themes studied include over-arching concepts such as imperialism and nationalism, culture and modernity, peace and conflict. Students will also understand and evaluate “narratives” in history leading to the establishment of the modern nation-state. Although the study of European civilization is prominent in this course, the experience of peoples from other regions will also play an integral role in understanding the social, economic and political complexities the 20th Century. Students will continue to develop their abilities in geographic and historical analysis with increasing sophistication and independence.

UNITED STATES HISTORY
Course # 305

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

This senior level survey course is structured around a selective chronology of U.S. History beginning with the Civil War and ending with the Cold War. Thematically, the course focuses on rights and responsibilities, American leadership as well as issues related to domestic and foreign policy. By the end of the course, students will have a greater understanding of the origins and role of the U.S. in the world today.

ECONOMICS
Course # 306

Length: Year Credit: 1.0

The study of Economics stems from the fundamental problem of scarcity and the ways in which humanity has responded to the allocation and use of available resources. As such, Economics is not limited to a narrow study of business organizations; rather it is concerned with the study of human behaviors on a much larger scale. In addition, the Economics course will encourage students to interpret data critically and objectively as part of a more scientific methodology for understanding topics and problems in Social Studies.

WORLD AFFAIRS
Course # 314

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

World Affairs is a course designed to address current issues nationally and internationally. The course will also focus on major areas of conflict in the world. In this course we will engage in critical evaluation on topics on social, political, intellectual, religious, and economic viewpoints. Students will experience simulations, debates, and technology incorporated into the curriculum. Throughout this course students will follow world affairs in various news sources.

World language classes provide instruction in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding the world language as well as a study of the culture. In today’s world, the ability to communicate in another language offers many advantages to students seeking employment or further study. In addition, research has shown that world language students develop a greater understanding of the structure of their own language, and develop a broader vocabulary in English.

ATIS requires that students complete one credit (two credits recommended) of study in a world language in preparation for university admission. A number of universities include world language proficiency as a graduation requirement. Students are encouraged to continue world language study throughout high school to meet the demands of universities admission policies.

One World Language credit is required for graduation from ATIS. World Language credit must be taken consecutive.

Flow Chart of World Language Courses:

LangDepart

FRENCH 1
Course # 803

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Pre-requisite: None
In this course, the four language skills are developed in their natural order: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of vocabulary and an in-depth understanding of grammatical structures. In addition, students will gain information about French-speaking civilization, culture, and customs.

FRENCH 2
Course # 804

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Pre-requisite: FRENCH 1
The course will reinforce and expand the foundation established in FRENCH 1. There is continuation in the learning of grammatical structures with an emphasis on reading, writing, and speaking the language. Vocabulary is increased and correct language patterns are encouraged. Throughout this course, a greater use of French with less dependence upon English also strengthens the student’s ability to communicate in the French language.

FRENCH 3
Course # 805

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Pre-requisite: FRENCH 2
Emphasis is placed on increasing the student’s oral and reading skills. Grammar points are reviewed and stressed as the student seeks greater proficiency in the language. Emphasis in reading is placed on the history and literature of France so that the student may be aware of the development of French culture. Through the reading of French and the additional study of practical conversational expressions, the student’s active vocabulary is greatly increased.

Note: This course will be offered if interest and availability allows.

SPANISH 1
Course # 813

Length: Year Credit: 0.50

Pre-requisite: None
This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with emphasis on enabling students to function in practical situations.